Don Jones

Tech | Career | Musings

I’m starting to line up my writing for next year (I plan ahead) and was wondering what y’all would like to read about here on DonJones.com. Not PowerShell – I’ll keep that on PowerShell.org – but other topics are wide open. Any suggestions?

18 thoughts on “Whatcha Wanna Know?

  1. Kyle says:

    How to transition roles when it’s not a clear cut transition. IE technical to managerial or sales.

  2. More about IIS 8/8.5, like a Deep Dive book? Thank you so much!

  3. First of all, great blog! I am interested in everything related to System Center, more particular in how companies use it in every day life. On a sidenote, I am curious in your opinions on Mac Products and OSx – and how it influences your productivity. Thank you sir.

  4. The next 5 years in the IT industry, what’s big and what’s not?

  5. Rhys says:

    I view this blog at times as a mentor, I’ve got a number of posts bookmarked. I’d like to see a continuation of this “soft skill” approach to IT, challenging thinking and stressing CPD. I also like hearing war stories from IT, they can be quite funny and also can teach the odd thing (and I imagine you have a few to share!)

  6. More career and professional development advice, advice on dealing with people (customers, boss etc.), how to do consulting, based on your own experiences.

  7. vernanderson says:

    Azure from a PowerShell perspective and SCORCH and SMA from the architecture of it all perspective from the PS POV of course 😉

  8. Greg Altman says:

    I second the mentoring aspect. There doesn’t seem to be a lot of other advice beyond “buy my certification class to win at IT!”. Heck I think you could write a book on “Don’t be a Button Monkey” or as we call it in our house “Admins who say ‘NNF!'” (pronounced niff like skiff).

    1. Greg Altman says:

      PS: NNF = ” Next Next Finish”

  9. pringtef says:

    Selling automation to management would be a nice one. 🙂

  10. Julie says:

    +1 Mentor topics.

  11. I would echo whats already been said in the comments. The soft skills, managerial, organizational planning/thinking, etc.

  12. Gael says:

    Might be too broad or abstract, but here’s a few questions I have.
    How to transition from ‘traditional’ IT Operations to DevOps?
    As a consultant, have you seen companies with Windows or hybrid infrastructure succeeding to embrace the DevOps principles besides managing web farm (like desktop management)?
    What are the key success factors and what steps to go through?
    What tools are missing from the market, and what has to be done in-house? (I liked your view in your post “Why I Think SCCM Will Probably Not Survive”, so what can we do instead or in parallel of investing in SC12/SCCM? What will we or MS have to do?)

    We know the goal is better IT Management and control via automation and custom tools, but how to convince management of the need for investing in DevOps?
    Not to forget, how to convince SysAdmins to become DevOps? I have the feeling that it should be natural, but it’s not…

  13. FoxDeploy says:

    I always like to see examples in PowerShell of what to do, vs. what not to do.

    For instance, some of my favorite episodes of the PowerScripting podcast have involved you and other guests ranting about some bit of syntax or scripting behavior that annoys you. More of this stuff is always fun and is great learning experienxes.

    People don;’t know they’re sucking until they’re told how they should be doing it!

    One last idea: how abut the basics of how to teach a PowerShell class?

  14. Wes Holton says:

    Work \ Life Balance; IT-related Stress

  15. magmadk says:

    Hey Don

    Like to know more about your approach on getting people on the Powershell boat.
    I’m having a hard time selling it, to others that don’t know powershell.

    And doing this without having a ton of cool show off code and moduels.
    Thanks
    Daniel

    1. Don Jones says:

      I’ll consider that for a PowerShell.org post, but this site is more personal/business in nature – not PowerShell.

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