Don Jones

Tech | Career | Musings

DevOps/DSC Camp isn’t a conference – it’s a “working group” of enthusiastic professionals who share their experiences, practices, challenges, and triumphs. Only 20 people are admitted and we have a high alumni rate – and alumni are asked to prepare a presentation. No, we don’t record or stream – you need to be here live! Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/devopsdsc-camp-2017-tickets-31137067808. Here’s one alumni session currently proposed:

Machine Learning with PowerShell

Bryce McDonald

This will begin with a brief talk about the concepts of machine learning, what it is, what it’s used for, and common methods for doing machine learning today.  I’ll also talk a little bit on the pros and cons of using Azure’s machine learning resources.

Next, we’ll discuss the code behind machine learning and how it works (this may or may not involve a short lesson on matrix multiplication as well) and discuss “next steps” for the code of my PowerShell machine learning module.

Don’s note: One of the cool things about Camp is the kinda random directions we’ll run in. Bryce’s proposal here might not look like DevOps or DSC, but it’s an important area of technology. It’s fine for us to focus on topics that help round out our careers – and indeed, “career” is the main point of Camp in the first place.

Issue has become one of those annoying “soft” words that’s intended to take the sting – and all legitimate meaning – out of a conversation. It sounds mean to say, “we have a problem,” and so instead we say, “we have an issue.” But the word has a meaning already, and by misusing it, you’re neutering your conversations.

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DevOps/DSC Camp isn’t a conference – it’s a “working group” of enthusiastic professionals who share their experiences, practices, challenges, and triumphs. Only 20 people are admitted and we have a high alumni rate – and alumni are asked to prepare a presentation. No, we don’t record or stream – you need to be here live! Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/devopsdsc-camp-2017-tickets-31137067808. Here’s one alumni session currently proposed:

Automate a Best Practice PKI Infrastructure Using DSC

Missy Januszko

One of the biggest struggles I had when learning DSC was getting encrypted credentials to work.  My initial testing environment had a Windows 2008 R2 PKI and setting up the template for document encryption – and at the time, with limited documentation – wasn’t easy.  Once I had the template functional, I thought it would be “fun” to automate some PKI builds, including single-tier and two-tier PKI builds using DSC, including a DSC template that could automatically deploy a document encryption certificate to nodes.  I will review the steps and code for a single-tier PKI (which currently works in autolab) and the changes and struggles when switching it to a two-tier PKI.  Maybe I’ll even have it all working by then.  🙂

Don’s note: This is another thing I love about Camp. Missy’s pretty much the Diva of PKI in my mind, but it’s been an uphill battle to get all these bits working. At a conference, she’d probably never present this in a semi-finished form, but at Camp she absolutely can. We’re far more interested, as a group, in seeing how it’s put together and maybe offering a suggestion or two than we are in simply being lectured at.

With most public cloud providers, you get two broad categories of service to choose from: Platform as a Service (PaaS) or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). Or, broadly and more simply, “do you want a website” or “do you want a VM?” I’d argue that many people have a gut instinct to opt for IaaS, and that they’re often wrong for doing so.

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Categories: Tech

DevOps/DSC Camp isn’t a conference – it’s a “working group” of enthusiastic professionals who share their experiences, practices, challenges, and triumphs. Only 20 people are admitted and we have a high alumni rate – and alumni are asked to prepare a presentation. No, we don’t record or stream – you need to be here live! Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/devopsdsc-camp-2017-tickets-31137067808. Here’s one alumni session currently proposed:

Easing the Learning Curve of the DevOps Culture

Eli Hess

I work at an IT hosting firm, managing 2000 servers for 200+ clients. Every environment is unique so when I first heard the “Servers as Cattle” concept, I loved it but my brain melted when I began thinking about how to implement it. In this brief discussion, I will go over how I targeted a server role present in every company’s environment which could be easily slaughtered (and subsequently replaced) and then wrapped a GUI around building DSC configurations in an effort to get everyone using the technology without them needing to know how.

Don’s note: Given the “servers as cattle” message is one I’ve been preaching for a while, I’m looking forward to digging into how someone made it happen in their world. The great thing about Camp is that this won’t be a “session” in the way you’re used to at conferences. It’ll be a discussion – and I’m guessing an awesome one. I can’t wait to see some of the code.

Why are companies like Microsoft trying too push so hard for you to move toward cloud services?

Amazon, Google – those guys, it’s easy to understand, right? They’ve never had your on-prem dollar, and so “to the cloud!” is a win for them. But why are traditional on-prem vendors like Microsoft so pushy about Office 365, Azure, and the like?

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Categories: Tech

DevOps/DSC Camp isn’t a conference – it’s a “working group” of enthusiastic professionals who share their experiences, practices, challenges, and triumphs. Only 20 people are admitted and we have a high alumni rate – and alumni are asked to prepare a presentation. No, we don’t record or stream – you need to be here live! Register at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/devopsdsc-camp-2017-tickets-31137067808. Here’s one alumni session currently proposed:

Keeping Secrets with KeyStore

Paul Shamus

Keystore is an open source project built with PowerShell that allows you to securely store and retrieve sensitive information without the need for other third party tools. In the discussion, I will give a brief overview of the main components of it, how it works and where you can get it for yourself.

Don’s note: I’m deeply looking forward to this one. This whole “secrets storage” has increasingly become a thing for so many people that I seriously thought about starting my own project like this, until Paul proposed this overview. Can’t wait.